Image
Top
Navigation

Glossary

action tank: An effort inside or between organizations that sets goals, identifies the largest barriers to achieving those goals and takes action to remove those barriers; a more action-oriented version of the think tank.

Agrarian Economy: An economy centered around farming and the land.

Benefit Corporation (B Corp): A corporate form in the U.S. designed for for-profit entities that want to consider society and the environment in addition to profit in their decision making process. B Corps differ from traditional corporations in regards to their purpose, accountability and transparency.

bright spots: One of the five levers that can be used to move a market in the Purpose Economy, this lever is typically an effort, usually small-scale, that has achieved a remarkable result and can act as starting place for others to build or expand a market.

calling: A psychological approach to work that experiences work and life as seamless. It is most commonly influenced by the psychological approach modeled by parents. See also career and job.

career: A psychological approach to work that defines work as core to self-esteem and success relative to peers. It is most commonly influenced by the psychological approach modeled by parents. See also Calling and Jobs.

community organizing: The process of identifying, recruiting, and developing leadership, building community around that leadership, and building power out of that community to create meaningful change.

disruptive technology: One of the five levers that can be used to move a market in the Purpose Economy, this lever can change our understanding of what is possible and give markets new tools to advance their growth through the use of new technology.

diffusion of innovations: Theory created by Everett Rogers explaining how, why, and at what rate new ideas and technologies spread through culture. The adoption of innovation is inherently social in nature.

economic evolution: The emergent nature of economies in which each new dominant economy grows out of the foundation of the prior dominant economy. However, instead of displacing the prior economy, the new economy complements and builds from it, serving human needs in distinctive new ways.

five levers for social change: The only five ways to move a market in the Purpose Economy. The five levers are research, policy, public perception, disruptive technology, and bright spots.

Gross Domestic Product (GDP): The market value of all officially recognized final goods and services produced within a country in a given period of time. GDP per capita is often considered an indicator of a country’s standard of living.

job-crafting: A process for reimagining your work life which involves redefining your job to incorporate your motives, strengths, and passions. This exercise prompts you to visualize the job, map its elements, and reorganize them to better suit you.

job: A psychological approach to work that frames work as a means to enable life outside work. It is most commonly influenced by the psychological approach modeled by parents. See also career and calling.

human-centered design: A process that has been used for decades to create new solutions to design challenges. The process helps people hear the needs of the people and communities they’re designing for, create innovative approaches to meet these needs, and deliver solutions that work in specific cultural and economic contexts.

human-scale: An urban design term meaning a manageable scale based on solid understanding and appreciation of community and livability. This scale can be measured qualitatively or quantitatively.

Industrial Economy: Post-Industrial Revolution economy driven by the use of technology to enable increased production of material goods, supporting a larger population with a high capacity for divisions of labor.

Information Economy: An economy with an increased emphasis on informational activities and information industry. The Information Economy as we know it began emerging in earnest in the 1950s. New technologies formed the infrastructure of the Information Economy, culminating with the evolution of the Internet.

market: A cluster of activity in an economy centered around the adoption of specific good, service or behavior change.

millennial: A person reaching young adulthood around the year 2000. Also known as Generation Y, this demographic cohort is most often referring to people born from the early 1980s to the early 2000s.

policy: One of the five levers that can be used to move a market in the Purpose Economy, the policy lever is typically used to change the rules of the game. It is most often used to describe efforts to change corporate or government policies that impact a market.

pro bono: A Latin phrase meaning “for the public good”. Today, it is used to describe professional work undertaken voluntarily and without payment or at a reduced fee as a public service.

public perception: One of the five levers that can be used to move a market in the Purpose Economy, this lever provides a population a new way of thinking about a market, changing consciousness, and reframing an issue to catalyze social change.

purpose: The reason for which something is done or created, or for which something exists. In the case of the Purpose Economy, purpose goes beyond serving others and the planet and also indicates the search for a sense of community and the opportunity for self-expression and personal development.

Purpose Economy: The emerging economy defined by the quest for people to have more purpose in their lives. It is an economy where value creation is focused on enabling purpose for employees and customers—through serving needs greater than their own, enabling personal growth, and building community.

purpose pattern: A way of classifying how people find purpose and fulfillment in their work based upon who they serve, how they serve them and why they serve them. It is most powerfully expressed as a personal mission or purpose statement.

research: One of the five levers that can be used to move a market in the Purpose Economy, this lever, driven by data and often found in academic settings, can provide insights that inspire leaders and entrepreneurs to change their understanding of a market.

sharing: The joint use of a resource or space.

social capital: A person’s relationships and the benefits he or she sees from these relationships. The expected collective or economic benefits derived from the preferential treatment and cooperation between individuals and groups.

social impact: The effect of an activity on the social fabric of the community and well-being of the individuals, families and society.

social media: Interactions among people in which they create, share, and/or exchange information and ideas in virtual communities and networks.

well-being: The condition of an individual or group, for example, their social, economic, psychological, spiritual or medical state; the state of being happy, healthy, or successful.

Pre-Order Book